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Mid-Century Modern

is an architectural, interior, product and graphic design that generally describes mid-20th century developments in modern design, architecture and urban development from roughly 1933 to 1965. The term, employed as a style descriptor as early as the mid-1950s, celebrating the style that is now recognized by scholars and museums worldwide as a significant design movement.

Author Cara Greenberg coined the phrase “midcentury modern” as the title for her 1984 book, Midcentury Modern: Furniture of the 1950s. In 1983, Greenberg had written a piece for Metropolitan Home about 1950s furniture, and an editor at Crown urged her to write a book on the topic. As for the phrase “midcentury modern,” Greenberg “just made that up as the book’s title,” she says. A New York Times review of the book acknowledged that Greenberg’s tome hit on a trend. “Some love it and others simply can’t stand it, but there is no denying that the 50’s are back in vogue again. Cara Greenberg, the author of ‘Mid- Century Modern: Furniture of the 1950’s’ ($30, Harmony Books) manages to convey the verve, imagination and the occasional pure zaniness of the period.” The book was an immediate hit, selling more than 100,000 copies, and once “midcentury modern” entered the lexicon, the phrase was quickly adopted by both the design world and the mainstream.

Though the American component was slightly more organic in form and less formal than the International Style, it is more firmly related to it than any other. Brazilian and Scandinavian architects were very influential at this time, with a style characterized by clean simplicity and integration with nature. Like many of Wright’s designs, Mid-Century architecture was frequently employed in residential structures with the goal of bringing modernism into America’s post-war suburbs. This style emphasized creating structures with ample windows and open floor plans, with the intention of opening up interior spaces and bringing the outdoors in. Many Mid-century houses utilized then-groundbreaking post and beam architectural design that eliminated bulky support walls in favor of walls seemingly made of glass.